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2017

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Noncognitive Variables to Predict Academic Success Among Junior Year Baccalaureate Nursing Students, Ellen Mary Tuve Smith

2016

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“My Training Wheels are Off:” How First Generation College Students Made Meaning of the Influence of their College Access and Support Programs, Staci Weber

2015

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TRANSFER RATES AND BACCALAUREATE ATTAINMENT: TWO-YEAR VERSUS HYBRID COLLEGES, David M. Gerlach

2014

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IS FAITH ON THE CAMPUS TOUR? RURAL, PUBLIC COLLEGE STUDENTS' EXPLORATION OF SPIRITUAL AND RELIGIOUS IDENTITY, Tamara Durant

2012

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The Impact of Curricular Learning Communities on Furthering the Engagement and Persistence Of Academically Underprepared Students at Community Colleges, Joshua Grant McIntosh

2010

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"Only connect": A mixed methods study of how first-year students create residential academic and social networks, Rachel Anne Smith

2008

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How college students make sense of organizational structures and work in schools as participants in a paid service learning program, Stacey Riemer

2006

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The impact of study abroad on college student intellectual development, Joshua S. McKeown

2005

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An assessment of Tech Prep: Students' educational and psychosocial outcomes in a case study model, Janet Jamison Glocker

2004

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How faculty make sense of administrative methods and motives for change: A study of an assessment initiative at a private university, Bronwyn E. Adam

2003

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An exploration of how new registered nurses construct their professional identity in hospital settings, Denise Irene Deppoliti

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The educational computing coordinator in New York State: Scope and functions, Bernard John Gerard Tomasso

2002

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The impact of learning communities on intellectual outcomes of first-year students, Stephen Robert St. Onge

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"Totally focused on God": How undergraduate student members of Christian parachurch groups construct what it means to be a person of faith, Thomas Van Dyke Wolfe

2001

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Characterizing change in the public sector labor-management relationship: A comparative study, Gary W. Porcelli

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Students' perceptions of and experiences in a community standards residential environment, Julie Lynn Rawls

2000

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Playing beneath the rim: A case study of an NCAA Division I women's basketball team, Valerie Jean Cushman

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Understanding the Advanced Calculus Workshops through the voices of students of African descent, Lori Hunter-Union

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Match between learning styles and teaching methods: An exploratory study of the effects on nursing student's academic performance, perceived learning, and course evaluations, Cathleen C. McColgin

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Becoming a cooperative learner: Supplemental instruction experiences at a community college, Carol A. Van Der Karr

1999

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Student knowledge retention in college classrooms: Traditional versus interactive lectures, Bradley C. Beran

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Student perceptions of learning and their relationship to student ratings of college teaching effectiveness, Noreen Bridget Gaubatz

1998

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A discrepancy analysis approach for determining undergraduate student satisfaction with their life on campus, Peter Michael Baigent

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Marginally accepted: Policies and practices influencing the enrollment of Black students at Syracuse University from 1942 to 1969, Marla Anne Bennett

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Development change in college students: A study based on Chickering's model of student development, Linda Messer Martin

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Meaningful work: A study of women faculty members at a community college, Mary Elizabeth McMann

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Predicting freshmen persistence and voluntary withdrawal from Heath's model of maturing, George Daniel Miller III

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The effect of institutional financial aid and other factors on freshman matriculation decisions, James Glenn Miller

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Background characteristics and educational aspirations of rural eighth graders, Karen Margaret Schuhle-Williams

1997

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How faculty of color construct the promotion and tenure process, Benjamin Baez

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Early use of worldwide electronic mailing lists by social science and humanities scholars in the United States, Robin Patricia, Peek

1995

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Using a computer laboratory setting (CLS) to teach college calculus, Nkechi Madonna Adeleine Agwu

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Cognitive, metacognitive, and social aspects of mathematical proof with respect to calculus, Ewa Anna Prus-Wisniowska

1994

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Influences on student course progress in an independent study degree program: A student perspective, David E. Brigham

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Parents' perspectives on relationships with professionals in inclusive educational settings, Linda Davern

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Supporting college learners: Relations between metacognition, reading and writing proficiency, and locus of control, Amelia E. El-Hindi

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Deterrents to participation in continuing education programs among university-based nurse faculty, Elizabeth Rossi Essman

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Job competencies expected of entry-level foodservice managers: Implications for curriculum development, Norman A. Faiola

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The definition of educational technology: An intellectual and historical account, Alan Januszewski

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The diffusion of educational television at the United States Military Academy, Mitchell E. Marovitz

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Racial identity attitudes of African American students and student developmental tasks: An exploratory investigation, Richard Charles Peagler

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Rural school consolidation in New York State, 1795-1993: A struggle for control, Thomas J. Pugh

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A model of developmental change in freshman students: Confirming Chickering's theory of student development, William Scott Thieke

1993

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Correlates of vocational outcome of adult women cancer survivors, Roseann Segretto Falise

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How nurse educators in associate degree programs learn to teach, Carol Ann Fanutti

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Freshman interest groups: Linking social and academic experiences of first-year students, Anne S. Goodsell

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The factors that black college freshmen perceive as contributing to their social and academic integration within a predominantly white university, Howard Junior Miller

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Constructs describing the expert teacher: How do elementary school principals, school board members, and university based educational researchers describe the expert teacher?, Fred Allan Schwartz

1991

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Adult non-traditional students' perceptions of the factors that contribute to a fulfilling college academic experience, Victoria Tomcho Fry

1990

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Retention of baccalaureate nursing students, Carole Fournier Cashion

1988

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An analysis of the diagnostic ability of graduating baccalaureate nursing students using computer clinical simulations, Margaret Stephanski Argentine

1983

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An Identification Of Effective Renewal Strategies For Small Private Liberal Arts Colleges, Robert Eugene Grinnell

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A Multi-Case Study Of The Self-Study Component Of The Regional Institutional Accreditation Process: Identifying Influential Factors, Edwin B. Harris

1981

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Developing A Plan For Saudi Arabian Women's Higher Education, Hend Majid Khuthaila

1980

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Organizational Response for Survival: A Case Study in Higher Education, Martine Floyd Hammond

1979

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Hervey Backus Wilbur and the Evolution of Policies and Practices toward Mentally Retarded People, Bernard John Graney

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Teacher planning: a simulation study, Susan Levy Mintz

1976

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A Study of Faculty Participation in Voluntary Higher Education Consortia and an Analysis of the Incentives and Rewards Offered By Consortia with High Levels of Faculty Involvement, Norman Saul Kaufman

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A Conceptual Analysis of Humanistic Education and the Theories of Abrahamh H. Maslow and Their Relationship to Higher Education, Constance A. Murray

1975

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Priorities and Attitudes of Four Decision Groups Regarding a Specific Educational Program: An Exploratory Study, David Wilfred Chapman

1961

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New York, New Yorkers, and the Two-Year-College Movement: A History of the Debate over Structure in Higher Education, Kenneth Thompson Doran

 

 Visit the Graduate School page to apply today!

Fall Admission Application Deadline:  March 1 (ALL application materials must be received by this date for consideration)

Spring Admission Application Deadline: Oct 1 (ALL application materials must be received by this date for consideration)

Mission

The Ph.D. Program in Higher Education at Morgan State University is designed to develop scholars and practitioners who will improve the worlds of higher and postsecondary education, as academic leaders, public policy experts, administrators, members of the professoriate, consultants, or training and development professionals. The program is a learning community characterized by scholarly rigor, strong connections to broader communities of practice, and a passion for contributing to the betterment of society through education. 

Our graduate programs are shaped by the following trends and issues:

  • A global economy demanding highly productive, creative, and adaptable workers
  • Demographic changes requiring attention to diversity and the multicultural contexts
  • Social and family changes necessitating coordination and collaboration with a variety of organizations to meet educational needs
  • The new technologies transforming social networks, instruction, and management tasks
  • Decentralized management and organizational systems requiring greater teamwork, human resource development, and accountability related to the mission of an institution or school;
  • The expectations of the policy community and the public that all individuals can and should achieve success in school
  • Increased levels of scrutiny and accountability for all activities within the campus environment

Our curriculum shifts student's thinking and action:

  • From technical skills to interpersonal skills
  • From command and direction to consensus building and motivating
  • From resource allocation to being accountable for learning processes and outcomes
  • From campus managers to leaders and integrators of resources, programs, and services
  • From policy recipient to policy shaper and participant

In our Higher Education Administration programs, our faculty seek to:

  • Enhance professional competence and communication skills
  • Promote social justice
  • Meet the needs of diverse learners
  • Engage and encourage reflective practice
  • Maintain a constructivist emphasis in teaching and learning
  • Encourage partnerships and collegiality

Through the process of self-reflection, our educational community will value:

  • Continuous growth in professional practice and competence
  • Respect for the uniqueness of all individuals
  • Ethical advocacy on behalf of individuals or groups experiencing discrimination

To that end, we expect all graduates of our programs will be able to:

  • Advance Social Justice & Transformative Practice within the campus community
  • Promote Stakeholder Development (student, alumni, donor, faculty, staff, administrator, community, etc.)
  • Enhance the Organization and Administration of their University/College
  • Engage in Independent Assessment, Evaluation, and Research

Goals of the Higher Education Administration PhD Program

The PhD program in Higher Education Administration recognizes the breadth of prior experiences, the various career paths that students are on, and the diversity of post-graduate opportunities students may pursue. Given this, there are five primary goals of the PhD program:

  • To provide students with grounding in the conceptual underpinnings of the practice of Higher Education.
  • To provide students with a broad appreciation and understanding of educational systems in social, historical, and normative perspectives as one basis for the exercise of educational leadership.
  • To expand students' theoretical understanding of administrative practice through study of one or more disciplines related to Higher Education Administration.
  • To convey inquiry skills useful to the practice of higher education and to the conduct of research in the field.
  • To provide opportunities to connect theoretical understanding to problems and contexts of practice through field-based experiences.

Program Admissions Requirements

  1. Applicants are required to have at least 1 year of post-master's, full-time professional work experience in a college/university setting, or closely related professional experience (such as a higher education association, policy association, state/federal agency focused on higher education, etc.) that would allow an applicant to understand the context and general environment of higher education.
  2. Official transcripts of all academic work completed at other regionally accredited institutions of higher education. Applicants are expected to have a GPA of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale for the last two years of undergraduate work, and a GPA of 3.5 or better on all postgraduate study beyond the baccalaureate degree.
  3. Three (3) official recommendations from supervisors, faculty, or professionals who can comment on and attest to applicant's ability to engage in doctoral level work. Note that recommendations can not come from family members.
  4. Written statement outlining applicant's background and experience in higher education, specific career goals in higher education, and how achieving a PhD through Morgan State University's program will assist in accomplishing those career goals. Applicants should also discuss any research ideas about the dissertation, and how faculty might be able to support and nurture research ideas.
  5. A current resume or curriculum vita, documenting professional experiences.
  6. A sample of professional writing (such as a professional paper, grant proposal, publication, or research proposal abstracts). If applicant does not have a recent professional writing sample, applicants are asked to respond to the following question:  In a 4-5 page essay, what do you see as three (3) major trends or issues facing higher education? What are the implications of these trends/issues for campuses (including students, faculty, staff, or other constituents)? 
  7. Personal interview with program faculty (at discretion of faculty).
  8. International students, whose native language is not English, must provide a TOEFL score of 550 or higher and demonstrate through the required written documentation and interview that they have requisite verbal, written, and analytical skills needed to successfully complete the program.
  9. NOTE: As of October 2017 GRE/MAT tests are no longer required for admission into the PhD program.

All application materials must be sent directly to the Graduate School. Any materials sent to the department or the admission coordinator will not be placed in an applicant's file. It is the reponsibility of applicants top ensure that all materials are sent in; applicants should not ask the department to follow-up on their behalf.

Residency Requirements

Part-time candidates for the PhD degree will satisfy residency requirements by completing 18 credit hours over a period of three consecutive semesters (not including summer). Full-time doctoral candidates must complete two consecutive semesters, carrying 9 credit hours each semester, to satisfy residency requirements. Upon completion of the course requirements and the comprehensive examination, the candidate must first complete RDHE 998-Dissertation Seminar (6 credits) and then RDHE 979-Dissertation Guidance (3 credits) each semester until the dissertation has been successfully defended. All requirements for the PhD degree must be completed within a period of seven consecutive years. The granting of a leave of absence by the School of Graduate Studies does not automatically extend this time limit.

General Requirements (72 credits total) (as of August 2016) 

I. Required Core/Foundations Courses (27 credits)

There are 27 credits required of each student; these courses provide broad overviews of the key aspects of postsecondary education, from both contemporary and historical perspectives.

  • ASLP 600 Introduction to Doctoral Studies (3)
  • ASLF 601 Higher Education Finance (3)
  • RDHE 702 Historical Foundations of Higher Education (3)
  • RDHE 703 Multiculturalism and Diversity in Higher Education (3)
  • RDHE 704 Higher Education Policy Analysis (3)
  • RDHE 731 Governance and Administration in Higher Education (3)
  • RDHE 727 Legal Aspects of Higher Education (3)
  • RDHE 744 Politics of Higher Education (3)
  • RDHE 722 Organizational Theory in Higher Education (3)

II.  Research Courses (15 credits)

Since the PhD is a research degree, the research requirement consists of both introductory and advanced courses in quantitative and qualitative methods

Introductory Methods (6 credits)

  • EDSR 719 Quantitative Data Analysis I (Stats 1)(3)
  • EDSR 624 Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods (3)

Advanced Methods (9 credits)

  • EDSR 622 Quantitative Research Methodology (3)
  • EDSR 819 Quantitative Data Analysis II (Stats 2) (3)
  • EDSR 818 Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (3)

III. Specialization/Concentration (18 credits)

The Specialization consists of a set of courses comprising in-depth study in the concentration. The Specialization should be developed in consultation with your Advisor and should provide depth and study in areas of interest to students. Courses may be taken from outside the School of Education to complete the concentration with the permission of student's Advisor. In addition, ASLP 691/791/891: Special Topics courses may be taken to fulfill the concentration electives. These Special Topics courses are offered regularly by program faculty; recent such courses have included: Advanced Student Development Theory, Contemporary Issues in Student Affairs Administration, and Exploring and Understanding Organizational Culture (Advanced Topics in Organizational Theory), and Critical Race Theory in Educational Research. As part of the Specialization, students may be required to complete an internship as described below.

  • Specialization Electives (12-18 credits)
  • RDHE 885 Internship in Higher Education  (0-6 credits) --  The purpose of the Internship is to allow graduate students the opportunity to explore different areas of professional interest, to develop additional skill sets, and to add to one's professional knowledge base within different higher educational settings. The faculty recognize that students will come into the PhD program with a wide variety of prior experiences. To this end, the following policy exists in relation to Internship expectations for Higher Education PhD students:
    • International students with limited or no work experience in US settings: 2 (two) Internships will be required, both counting towards the Specialization/Concentration requirements.
    • US students with less than 3 years full time professional work experience in higher education, or for those without a master's degree in higher education/student affairs: 2 (two) Internships will be required, both counting towards the Specialization/Concentration requirements.
    • Students with a master's degree in higher education/student affairs and with more than 3 years professional experience work experience in higher education, 1 (one) internship will be required counting towards the Specialization/Concentration requirements.
    • Students with more than 8 years of full-time professional work experience in higher education may request in writing that their internship requirement be waived. In lieu of the internship, students would be required to complete an additional course to fulfill Specialization/Concentration requirements.

IV. Dissertation Preparation/Capstone Methods Course (3 credits)

  • EDSR 889 Research Practicum (3)

V. Dissertation Courses (completed independently with dissertation chair) (9 credits minimum)

  • RDHE 998-Dissertation Seminar (6)
  • RDHE 997-Dissertation Guidance (students re-register for this course until the dissertation is defended) (3) 

For more information about the PhD Program, contact either:

Dr. Benjamin Welsh, Associate Professor & Program Coordinator
E: Benjamin.Welsh@morgan.edu
P: (443) 885-3748

Dr. Sean Robinson, Associate Professor & Admissions Coordinator
E: Sean.Robinson@morgan.edu

 Visit the Graduate School page to apply today!

Fall Admission Application Deadline: March 1 (ALL application materials must be received by this date for consideration)

Spring Admission Application Deadline: Oct 1 (ALL application materials must be received by this date for consdieration)

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